Saturday, December 23, 2017

January Library Calendar - Click for full siz.


Mudgy & Santa Sing-Along

About 400 people attended the Holiday Sing-Along with Mudgy and Santa
on Dec. 9. Susan Nipp, author of “Mudgy & Millie,” led the
singing with help from her title characters and St. Nick during
the event which is organized by the author and sponsored
by the Library Foundation. Photo by Foundation President Ben Drake.

Open House Says Yes to Talking Books!

A celebration of the life of Louis Braille – the inventor of the raised-dot system used by blind readers – and the Talking Book Service (TBS) which provides audiobooks and special players to those with visual and physical challenges will be part of an open house at the library.
“Say Yes to TBS” will be Thursday, Jan. 11, 2-6 p.m., in the Community Room.
The event will include displays of TBS materials and a reading of “Six Dots,” the story of the young Braille. Local agencies serving people with vision loss and other issues have been asked to come with information about their services. Refreshments will be served.
TBS is administered by the Idaho Commission for Libraries and is supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The free service is available to any Idaho resident unable to read standard print dues to any permanent or temporary physical disability, including vision impairment or because the individual is unable to hold a book or turn the pages.
TBS users are provided a free playback device, books and magazines, and postage to return items. Materials are delivered directly to the user’s home. Braille materials can also be provided, as well, as downloadable audiobooks. There are currently more than 75,000 items available in English, Spanish, and other languages.
Additional information is available by contacting Outreach Coordinator Barbara Brambila-Smith, at 208-769-2316 or by e-mail at            bbrambila@cdalibrary.org. TBS can be contacted directly at 800-458-3271.
Louis Braille was born in 1809. He lost his sight at 3 years old when he was using an awl in his father’s harness shop and it slipped and injured his eye. Infection developed and spread and he lost the sight in both eyes. At age 10, he began attending the Royal Institution for Blind Youth. He learned to read using its library of huge books that had large raised letters, a process the impatient young man found very cumbersome.
Then in 1821, a former soldier named Charles Barbier visited the school. Barbier shared his invention called “night writing,” a code of 12 raised dots that let soldiers share top-secret information on the battlefield without even having to speak. Unfortunately, the code was too hard for the soldiers, but not for 12-year-old Louis.
Braille trimmed Barbier's 12 dots to six, ironed out the system by the time he was 15, then published the first-ever braille book in 1829.  In 1837, he added symbols for math and music. But since the public was skeptical, blind students had to study braille on their own.
Even at the Royal Institution, where Louis taught after he graduated, braille wasn't taught until after his death in 1852.
Braille began to spread worldwide in 1868, when a group of British men, now known as the Royal National Institute for the Blind, took up the cause.

Talking Books Helps Give All Access to Reading

By ANN JOSLIN
Idaho State Librarian,
Idaho Commission for Libraries


An easy-to-use listening device is provided free of charge to patrons
using the Talking Book Service.

Louis Braille, the inventor of the raised-dot system that lets the blind read, had a brilliant vision: to help the visually impaired not just read but be treated as equals.
So do Idaho libraries: to ensure all the approximately 45,000 eligible users are aware of Idaho’s Talking Book Service and help them register for this free program that notably improves the quality of users’ lives.
This Braille and audio book library is available to any Idahoan who is unable to read standard print due to a physical disability. It applies to permanent and temporary disabilities and includes people who are legally blind, visually impaired, or unable to hold a book or turn pages.
Although the Talking Book Service has traditionally been known as a program for the blind, people dealing with diseases and physical disabilities affecting motor function, such as Parkinson’s and paraplegia, enroll in it, too.
The Idaho Commission for Libraries maintains a collection of 82,000 Braille and audio book titles and adds another 2,000 annually. This includes audio books about Idaho and the Pacific Northwest recorded in our in-house studios. Similar to collections you’d find in any public library, Idaho’s Talking Book Service offers nonfiction works on everything from astronomy to zoology and fiction genres ranging from mysteries and romance to westerns, sci-fi, and children’s books.
It also offers more than 300 national magazines, including a half-dozen from Idaho, plus 50 or so newspapers, including The Idaho Statesman, Post Register, and The Spokesman-Review.
Books and magazines are available in many languages besides English, and 15 percent of the collection is in Spanish.
Statewide users can call a toll-free number — (800) 458-3271 — to talk with knowledgeable staff able to help users find the perfect reading materials.
All materials — including a digital player — are mailed directly to your home free of charge with return postage included. Plus, you can download many of the materials from an online database if you have high-speed Internet access.
You must be certified as eligible to use the Talking Book Service, but staff at your local library can easily handle that.
Need more incentive to check out the Talking Book Service? A recent University of Idaho study finds most patrons think highly of the program, with 96 percent rating it “good” or better and 72 percent rating it “excellent.”
Chief among the many quotes from survey respondents that sum up the Talking Book Service well is this gem: “This has been a lifesaver; it keeps me going and in contact with the outside world.”
Many Idaho libraries will celebrate the 209th anniversary of Braille’s birth Jan. 4. As this milestone approaches, please help us realize his important vision by referring those in your life who may benefit from the program to:                         libraries.idaho.gov/tbs or to their local library.
In addition to helping people overcome challenges and normalize their lives, Idaho’s Talking Book Service demonstrates how libraries enrich communities and promote a culture of inclusivity.

New Pageturners Series Begins

Talking Book Editions Available for Qualified Subscribers
The Coeur d’Alene Public Library’s Pageturners Book Club begins a new series as part of the Let’s Talk About It (LTAI) program with books provided by the Idaho Commission for Libraries.
All of the titles in these series are also being made available through the Talking Book Service.
“Stone Angel” by Margaret Laurence will be discussed on Jan. 24, at 10:15 a.m. in the Community Room. Barbara Meldrum will be the scholar for the discussion. The Talking Book number for “Stone Angels” is DB04762.
The upcoming titles, their discussion dates, and the Talking Book numbers include:
► “Memory of Old Jack” – Feb. 28, DBC00873.
► “Women of Brewster Place” – March 28, DB025314.
► “Crossing to Safety” – April 25, DB09441.
► “Empire Falls” – May 23, DB052601.
The theme for the series is “Growing Older, Growing Wiser.” Discussion leaders for the series are provided by the Idaho Humanities Council, the state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The program is also sponsored by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Local funding is provided by the Friends of the Library.
The print copies of the books will be available at the Research and Information Desk. Discussions are open to any adult reader. Talking Book Service users can reserve their books for the series by calling 800-458-3271. To see if you qualify for Talking Books, contact Barbara Brambila-Smith, outreach coordinator for the library, at 208-769-2316 or by email at bbrambila@cdalibrary.org.

New Inland Noirthwest Milestones Series Begins with Library

The library was housed for a time on the second floor of the Exchange
Bank, now a local coffee shop. (Retouched photo.)

The history of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library will be featured Thursday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m., as regional historian Robert Singletary begins a new Inland Northwest Milestones series in the Community Room.
The series, featuring the people, events, and developments that shaped the region, is presented in partnership with the Museum of North Idaho, where Singletary is the director of marketing and programming, with additional support from the Friends of the Library.
The new series will continue through May and is scheduled for the fourth Thursday of the month at the same time and location.
The library was founded by the Coeur d’Alene Woman’s Club. The club was organized in 1904 and the following year asked the community to contribute books, magazines, and subscriptions for a new public library at a reception in what was then called Blackwell Park.
The Coeur d’Alene Public Library opened its doors in the store of E.B. Keller and Co. two doors east of the intersection of Fourth Street and Sherman Avenue. Owners E.B. Keller and Charles Dittmore donated three shelves. Miss Anna Elderkin was in charge of the Library – open 2-4 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
The library went on to occupy a series of buildings – none of which was designed to be a library – until the current building was constructed in 2007.
The library became a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene in 1909 when it was housed in the City Hall building built the year before on Sherman Avenue.
The Museum of North Idaho is located at 115 Northwest Blvd. in front of the Coeur d'Alene City Park. It is open Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to Oct. 31. The museum library and office are open by appointment year round. For more information call 208-664-3448.

History of City Park Making Return Engagement

Jon Mueller
A popular presentation on the history of Coeur d’Alene’s City Park will make a return engagement to the library Thursday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room.
The closure of Fort Sherman and the building of a railroad line that brought new tourists to the young community of Coeur d’Alene were among the factors that led to creation of City Park.
Landscape architect Jon Mueller will share stories and images from his new book, “Private Park, Public Park: A Story of Coeur d’Alene and its First Park.”
“This is the story of the creation of Coeur d’Alene’s first park and one of the oldest in the State of Idaho,” Mueller said. “Its origins are found in the will of determined local people and newly arrived captains of industry. Its frame of reference is not only intertwined with and a part of the state and local history of the time, but also with the national movements of the era.”
Originally known as Blackwell Park, it would eventually be called Coeur d’Alene City Park and become a centerpiece in the life, economy, and culture of the community.
 Jonathon Mueller is a landscape architect with more than 35 years of experience and a background in park and recreation planning and design. His list of completed works includes projects in seven western states.
A native of Coeur d’Alene, he also has an interest in history and governmental affairs.  He enjoys photography as a leisure pursuit and understands the power of images in storytelling.
Mueller is a past national president of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA).  He was elected to ASLA’s prestigious Council of Fellows in 2007, and a recipient of the ASLA President’s Medal in 2015.  He continues to make his home in Coeur d’Alene.
Copies of the book, also available through the Museum of North Idaho, will be available to purchase for signing at the event.

Novel Destinations Features African Safari

Mary Sanderson will share photos and stories from an African Safari that took her into Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana, Mozambique, and South Africa Friday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m., in the library Community Room.
The trip included two weeks with a tour organized by Overseas Adventure Travel and then three weeks of a self-guided safari and explorations. The rip included a unique park in Mozambique being restored by philanthropist Greg Carr, the Southern Africa Kruger Park, wine country, and the Capetown region. 
Novel Destinations, sponsored by the Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation, are travelogues based on trips taken by area residents who share their photos and stories.
These after-hours library programs are free, but donations are welcome.
Anyone with a travelogue to share at the library is asked to contact the Library Foundation at 208-769-2380 or by e-mail at cdalibraryfoundation@gmail.com.





Freegal is the Library Item You Can Check Out and Keep

Check out library books — you have to bring them back or face a fine. The same is true of DVDs and music CDs.
But the Coeur d’Alene Public Library and the other libraries in the Cooperative Information Network do offer one entertainment format that you can check out and keep.
Freegal is a free music service that allows patrons to download up to five songs per week using their library cards and to stream music from its collection of more than 9.5 million songs.
The collection offers more than 200 different genres from 80 different countries. More than a million songs were added in the last year alone. New music is available the same day it shows up in stores or on i-Tunes.
To use Freegal, patrons can go to the website for their home library. No special software is needed, but free Freegal apps are available for Apple and Android devices. The service is only available to library cardholders.

BINGO Continues for Winter Reading Programs

Winter reading programs begin Jan. 8 and will continue through March 16 in the Seagraves Children’s Library.
The New Author Blackout BINGO game for children continues through Feb. 28. BINGO cards are available at the Checkout Desk in the children’s library. There are two age groups for the game.
For 8 to 12 year-olds, the game encourages them to read books by authors they have not read before. Participants will receive prizes and raffle tickets for a grand prize for completing rows or blacking out their BINGO cards with titles from authors they have not previously read.
There is also a card for participants who are age 7 and younger with similar prize opportunities. The younger readers are encouraged to try new authors, but are not required to do so to participate in the game.
The 3D Maker Club for 10 to 14 year-old patrons continues utilizing one of the library’s new 3D printers. The program meets Tuesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m., in the Nelson Room at the southwest corner of the main library. The club will not meet Jan. 2.
Registration is required to participate in 3D Club. Call or visit the library to sign up.
The program may lead some participants to compete as part of the library’s team at the upcoming Idaho FabSLAM 2018 in February.
Winter reading programs for kids, “Alphabet Soup,” also includes these free programs:
► Spanish Bilingual Storytime: Mondays, 11 a.m. Learn some Spanish through stories, activities, and crafts for ages 3-6.
► Book Babies Lapsit:  Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m., and Fridays, 10:30 a.m., for children ages newborn to 2 accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver.
► Toddler Time Music & Motion: Tuesdays, 11 a.m., fun, songs, movement, and a story for 2-3 year olds.
► Lake City LEGO Club: Tuesdays, 4 p.m., at the Lake City Public Library in the high school on
Ramsey Road.
► Preschool Storytime: Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., stories and a craft geared to ages 3-5.
► Code Club: Wednesday, 4 p.m., learn coding basics with robots and video games. For ages 7-12.
► LEGO Club: Thursdays, 4 p.m., free play with the library’s huge collection of LEGOs.  Generally for ages 5 -11.
► Stay & Play: Fridays, 11 a.m., after Book Babies, families can stay for fun and socializing.
Children under 6 visiting the libraries need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.
For more information call 208-769-2315 Ext. 438 or e-mail Susan Thorpe, Youth Services Supervisor, at sthorpe@cdalibrary.org.

‘Be a Maker’ at LEGO-Rama Jan. 20

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO A DATE TO BE DETERMINED.
LEGO-rama – the program for young Master Builders will be Saturday, Jan. 20, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Community Room and other areas of the library.
“Be a Maker” is this year’s theme. Participants are invited to share their inventions and creative designs just for the pleasure of building.
One entry per participant is allowed in the design area for ages 4 to 13. Entries are limited to a 15-by-15 inch footprint (the space it occupies on a table). In a change from previous years the judging will be done entirely by the audience. Each person will receive a ballot and will be ask to select a People’s Choice winner in each age group, 4-7, 8-10, and 11-13.
Entries should be built prior to being brought to the library and can be delivered to the Community Room as early as 10:30 a.m. Balloting will continue until 12:15 p.m.
The event will also include the LEGO Pit with free play time using the library’s collection of LEGOs and also exhibits and activities promoting making in the Community Room, but also in the Children’s Library and the new Make-It Lab upstairs.
LEGO-rama, like all youth programs at the library, is supported by the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.

January Holidays will Close Building for Two Mondays

The Coeur d’Alene Public Library and the Lake City Public Library will be closed Monday, Jan. 1, for New Year’s.
The libraries will also be closed Monday, Jan 15, for Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
When the library is closed many services are available through the website, www.cdalibrary.org. Patrons can access their library records and place holds; download e-books through the OverDrive system and free music from Freegal; and utilize numerous online resources through the library databases.
Most online resources do require a user name and password. Obtain these before you need them by calling or visiting the library during open hours.

Teens Invited to C.R.A.S.H. at the Library After School

Except for Library League of Legends – Fridays at 4 p.m. in the Shirley Parker Storyroom – all of the previously scheduled teen programs have been replaced by C.R.A.S.H. (Cool Random After-School Hours).
Monday through Thursday, 3:30 to 6 p.m., craft supplies, games, and other activities will be available in the library’s Teen Central area, and Young Adult Coordinator Talley Gaskins will be available to provide assistance and reference services.
Gaskins described the concept as “pop-up programs.”
“This more informal structure will meet the kids where they are and hopefully help shake loose some more teen-led programming in future,” she said.
For more information contact Gaskins at tgaskins@cdalibrary.org or call 208-769-2315, Ext. 469.

Free STCU Workshop Looks At Protecting Your Credit Score

“Protect Your Credit Score” is the STCU workshop scheduled for Wednesday, Jan. 10, at noon in the Gozzer Room.
The free program will include a light meal for participants.
The workshop will cover why a good credit score is more important than ever, how scores are determined, how to earn and maintain a healthy credit score, and where to go for help.
To participate register online at www.stcu.org/workshops or call 855-753-0317.
The next STCU workshop will be “Organize your Finances” at noon on Feb 14.

Beyond the Book Club Reading “The Art of Racing in the Rain"

The Beyond the Book Club is reading “The Art of Racing in the Rain,” by Garth Stein, and will discuss the book and create a related watercolor on Tuesdays, Jan. 2 and 16, at 11:30 a.m.
The book is a 2008 novel — told from a dog's point of view - that follows the story of Denny Swift, a race car driver and customer representative in a Seattle BMW dealership, and his dog Enzo, who believes in the Mongolian legend that a dog who is prepared will be reincarnated in his next life as a human.

Knitting, Coloring Enthusiasts Have Creative Library Programs

The Well-Knit Tale Knitting Club is offered the first and third Tuesday of the month at 2:30 p.m. in the Jameson Room.
All skill levels of knitters and crocheters are welcome. Bring yarn, needles, and patterns. Refreshments provided.
Coffee and Coloring for adults meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month at 10 a.m. Drawing materials and refreshments are provided, or bring your own.

Get Ready to Garden With Third Annual Seed Swap Feb. 3

The third annual Seed Swap will be hosted by the library Saturday, Feb. 3, 1-3 p.m. in the library Community Room.
The swap is offered in partnership with The Inland Northwest Food Network and True To Seed: Seed Lending Library.
A seed swap is where growers bring their extra seeds – home-saved or purchased – to share with others and to take home seeds from others for spring planting.
You will also learn about seed saving from some of our region’s avid seed savers, and take home seed varieties that you won’t find anywhere else and that are well-adapted to our growing conditions.
No seeds to swap? Come anyway, and consider making a donation to help cover costs and help the seed program grow.
For more information about guidelines and what to expect contact Char Beach at the library or visit: www.inwfoodnetwork.org.

Food For Thought Reading ‘Plenty’ for February Discussion

The Food for Thought Book Club is reading “Plenty: Eating Locally on the 100-Mile Diet” by Alisa Smith.
The book will be discussed Wednesday, Feb. 7, at 6 p.m. in the Gozzer Room.
Like many great adventures, the 100-mile diet began with a memorable feast. Stranded in their off-the-grid summer cottage in the Canadian wilderness with unexpected guests, Smith and J.B. MacKinnon turned to the land around them.
They caught a trout, picked mushrooms, and mulled apples from an abandoned orchard with rose hips in wine. The experience raised a question: Was it possible to eat this way in their everyday lives?
Held in partnership with the Inland Northwest Food Network, discussions are open to anyone interested in the science, cultivation, and preparation of food.
For more information visit www.inwfoodnetwork.org.


Book-A-Librarian Provides Extended Technical Assistance

The library offers a Book-A-Librarian service for patrons who may need more help with technical issues or using library services than can be handled by an unscheduled visit to the Research and Information Desk.
One-hour one-on-one sessions can be scheduled with staff members for assistance using computers, e-readers, and tablets; downloading e-books or free music; using the databases for business planning or market research; working with Microsoft software; placing holds; books recommendations;  or similar questions.
Patrons with Internet access will be able to fill-out an online request under the SERVICES link on the library website: http://www.cdalibrary.org/component/proforms/online-library-forms/book-a-librarian.
Patrons can also call the Research and Information Desk, 208-769-2315, or visit the library for assistance filling out a request. The patron will then be contacted to set up an appointment for their help session.

For Better Service Keep Your Library Card Info Up To Date

If you change your phone number, address, email address or your name, be sure to contact the library to update your library card account.
If you don’t have your email on your account, it’s a good idea to add it. Email is often the easiest way for the library to contact you about holds and due dates.
Email also helps the library reduce costs by eliminating paper products and postage and keeps waste paper out of the landfills.
Treat your library card as if it was a credit card and do not share your number with others. Cardholders are financially responsible for materials checked out in their name.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

December Calendar - Click for full size.

Click here for the library's online calendar.

Annual Mudgy and Santa Holiday Sign-Along Dec. 9

Join the fun Saturday, Dec. 9, at 11 a.m., at the library with a special family activity, the sixth annual “Holiday Sing-Along With Mudgy and Santa.”
The free program will be in the Community Room on the lower level of the library. Easiest access will be from the lower parking lot behind City Hall and through the lower entrance.
Children’s author Susan Nipp, creator of the “Mudgy & Millie” book and the nationally known “Wee Sing” series of books and music, will lead the kids in singing some holiday favorites.
Mudgy Moose and Millie Mouse will be on hand along with Santa Claus and they will be available after the music for informal photos – so be sure to bring your cameras and phones.
Nipp and sculptor Terry Lee, who created the bronze statues along the Mudgy Trail, will also sign copies of “Mudgy & Millie.”
The book, which also features the illustrations of Charles Reasoner, was first published in 2008 with its royalties and those for “Mudgy & Millie” merchandise going to the Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation. Its release coincided with the unveiling of Lee’s bronzes and the opening of the 2.5-mile trail in cooperation with the City of Coeur d’Alene.
Information: 208-769-2380.

CIN Libraries Offer New Online Language Service



The Cooperative Information Network (CIN) – a group of 29 libraries in North Idaho and eastern Washington – now offers the Mango Languages online language-learning system to its patrons.
Mango is free for all library patrons and can be accessed anywhere with an Internet connection. Each lesson combines real-life situations and audio from native speakers with simple, clear instructions. The courses are presented with an appreciation for cultural nuance and real-world application by focusing on the four key elements of language learning: vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and culture.
Mango offers access to 60 foreign language courses and 17 English courses taught completely in the user’s native language. In addition to traditional language courses, Mango also offers the opportunity to learn through foreign film with Mango Premiere™ and access to a variety of specialty mini courses, like Pirate, Medical Spanish and romance courses. Mango can be accessed at the library, remotely, or even on-the-go with apps for iPhone®, Android™, Kindle® and Nook®.
“We are thrilled to join the growing list of libraries across the country that offer Mango to their patrons,” said Coeur d’Alene Public Library Director Bette Ammon. “Some people need to learn a second language for business or travel. Others want to for personal or professional development. No matter the reason, learning a language should be fun.”
To learn more about Mango, stop by a CIN member library and ask a librarian for an introduction. Library card holders can access Mango through their nearest library’s website.
The libraries of the Cooperative Information Network share a computer catalog, circulation services and a common library card in order to provide patrons in North Idaho and eastern Washington with better and more convenient access to library services and materials. The shared catalog can be accessed at: www.cinlibraries.org or through any of the websites for the CIN member libraries.
Founded in 2007, Mango Languages is the leading provider of language-learning resources in North American libraries. Mango is headquartered in Farmington Hills, Mich. Guided by its core purpose to enrich lives with language and culture, Mango Languages creates lovable language-learning experiences for libraries, schools, corporations, government agencies, and individuals. To learn more about the company visit www.mangolanguages.com.

Idaho Writers League Book Fair Offered

You can support and enjoy local authors and contribute to the library with Books For Christmas, an Idaho Writers League event, at the library Thursday, Dec. 7, beginning at 3:30 p.m.
Readers can meet the authors, participate in book giveaways, buy books, and have them signed throughout the event. A portion of each book sale will benefit the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
Participating authors will include contributors to the “Jewett House Centennial Anthology,” as well as these authors and their work: Jack Castle, Jenny Lamont Leo, Toby Neighbors, Matt Prescott, Ron Vergona, Suzanne Holland, Linda Shane, Anna Goodwin, Larry Telles, Joyce Nowacki, Diane Markley, Tom Reppert, Jim Payne, Emily Moore, and Tana Lovett.
Authors will speak and read from their books from 3:45 to 4:15 p.m., and again from 6:30 to 7 p.m.

Bucket List Trip to Norway Featured at Library

Visiting Norway was on the bucket list for Howard Funke, an attorney who has represented the Coeur d’Alene Tribe for more than 20 years.
He will be joined by Susan Coby, AKA the “Soup Goddess,” a chef at Soul CafĂ© for a Novel Destinations presentation at the library, Friday, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m.
Funke and Coby will share stories and images from the trip as part of the occasional series sponsored by the Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation presented in the Community Room.
Coby said that Funke has always wanted to visit Norway – he is half Norwegian and still has relatives who live above the Arctic Circle.
“I just love to travel,” she said, adding, “We were blown away with Norway's deep culture, the breathtaking diverse beauty and the warmth of everyone we encountered. Oh, yeah, and about half way into the trip we got married!”
The program is free, but donations are welcome.
Anyone with a travelogue to share at the library is asked to contact the Library Foundation at 208-769-2380 or by e-mail at cdalibraryfoundation@gmail.com.

BINGO Encourages Kids to Try New Authors

Holiday and winter reading programs will include a New Author Blackout BINGO game for children from Dec. 1 through Feb. 28 at the library.
BINGO cards are available at the Children’s Checkout Desk in the Seagraves Children’s Library on the lower level. There are two age groups for the game.
For 8 to 12 year-olds, the game encourages them to read books by authors they have not read before. Participants will receive prizes and raffle tickets for a grand prize for completing rows or blacking out their BINGO cards with titles from authors they have not previously read.
There is also a card for participants who are age 7 and younger with similar prize opportunities. The younger readers are encouraged to try new authors, but are not required to do so to participate in the game.
The 3D Maker Club for 10 to 14 year-old patrons continues into December utilizing one of the library’s new 3D printers. The program meets Tuesdays, 4-5:30 p.m., in the Nelson Room at the southwest corner of the main library. The club will not meet Dec. 26 or Jan. 2.
Registration is required to participate in 3D Club. Call or visit the library to sign up.
The program may lead some participants to compete as part of the library’s team at the upcoming Idaho FabSLAM 2018 in February.
Holiday reading programs for kids, “Seasons Readings,” will be offered through Dec. 22. These free programs include:
► Spanish Bilingual Storytime: Mondays, 11 a.m. Learn some Spanish through stories, activities, and crafts for ages 3-6.
► Book Babies Lapsit:  Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m., and Fridays, 10:30 a.m., for children ages newborn to 2 accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver.
► Toddler Time Music & Motion: Tuesdays, 11 a.m., fun, songs, movement, and a story for 2-3 year olds.
► Lake City LEGO Club: Tuesdays, 4 p.m., at the Lake City Public Library in the high school on
Ramsey Road.
► Preschool Storytime: Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., stories and a craft geared to ages 3-5.
► Code Club: Wednesday, 4 p.m., learn coding basics with robots and video games. For ages 7-12.
► LEGO Club: Thursdays, 4 p.m., free play with the library’s huge collection of LEGOs.  Generally for ages 5 -11.
► Stay & Play: Tuesdays, 11:30 am, after Toddler Time, and Fridays, 11 a.m., after Book Babies, families can stay for fun and socializing.
Children under 6 visiting the libraries need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.
For more information call 208-769-2315 Ext. 438 or e-mail Susan Thorpe, Youth Services Supervisor, at sthorpe@cdalibrary.org.



December Teen Programs Head in New Direction

Through the New Year, teen activities at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library at going to take on a different shape.
Except for Library League of Legends – Fridays at 4 p.m. in the Shirley Parker Storyroom – all of the previously scheduled teen programs are being replaced by C.R.A.S.H. (Cool Random After-School Hours).
Monday through Thursday, 3:30 to 6 p.m., craft supplies, games, and other activities will be available in the library’s Teen Central area, and Young Adult Coordinator Talley Gaskins will be available to provide assistance and reference services.
Gaskins described the concept as “pop-up programs.”
“This more informal structure will meet the kids where they are and hopefully help shake loose some more teen-led programming in future,” she said.
For more information contact Gaskins at tgaskins@cdalibrary.org or call 208-769-2315, Ext. 469.

New Let’s Talk About It Series Starts in January

The Pageturners Library Book Club isn’t meeting in December, but will be back in January with a new series as part of the Let’s Talk About It (LTAI) program with books provided by the Idaho Commission for Libraries.The theme for the series is “Growing Older, Growing Wiser.” Discussion leaders for the series are provided by the Idaho Humanities Council, the state-based affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
The program is also sponsored by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Local funding is provided by the Friends of the Library.
All discussions are held the fourth Wednesday of the month at 10:15 in the Community Room. Discussions are open to any adult reader. Copies of the books will be available at the Research and Information Desk. Titles in the series, their discussion dates, and discussion scholars include:
► “The Stone Angel” by Margaret Laurence, to be discussed Jan 24 with scholar Barbara Meldrum.
► “The Memory of Old Jack” by Wendell Berry, to be discussed Feb. 28 with scholar Ron McFarland.
► “The Women of Brewster Place” by Gloria Naylor, to be discussed March 28 with scholar Paula Coomer.
The book club’s April book will be "The Girl Who Wrote in Silk" by Kelli Estes as part of the North Idaho Reads project. The author is scheduled to speak at the library on April 20 and this evening program will replace the Pageturners’ regularly schedule discussion. This title is not part of the LTAI series.
► “Empire Falls” by Richard Russo, to be discussed May 23 with scholar Nancy Casey.
► “Crossing to Safety” by Wallace Stegner, to be discussed June 27 with scholar Jennifer Ladino.

Beyond the Book Club Reading ‘Five People’

The Beyond the Book Club is reading “The Five People You Meet in Heaven” by Mitch Albom, and will discuss the book and create a related watercolor on Tuesdays, Dec. 5 and 19, at 11:30 a.m.
The main character in the book, Eddie, is a grizzled war veteran who feels trapped in a meaningless life of fixing rides at a seaside amusement park. His days are a dull routine of work, loneliness, and regret.
Then, on his 83rd birthday, Eddie dies in a tragic accident, trying to save a little girl from a falling cart. He awakens in the afterlife, where he learns that heaven is not a lush Garden of Eden, but a place where your earthly life is explained to you by five people.
The January title is “The Art of Racing in the Rain,” by Garth Stein.

Knitting, Coloring Groups Are Programs for Adults

The Well-Knit Tale Knitting Club is offered the first and third Tuesday of the month at 2:30 p.m. in the Jameson Room.
All skill levels of knitters and crocheters are welcome. Bring yarn, needles, and patterns. Refreshments provided.
Coffee and Coloring for adults meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month at 10 a.m. Drawing materials and refreshments are provided, or bring your own.

Food For Thought to Talk About ‘Big Chicken’ Book

The Food for Thought Book Club is reading “Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats” by Maryn McKenna.
The book will be discussed Wednesday, Jan. 3, at 6 p.m. in the Gozzer Room.
What you eat matters—for your health, for the environment, and for future generations.
In this riveting investigative narrative, McKenna dives deep into the world of modern agriculture by way of chicken: from the farm where it's raised directly to your dinner table.
The book for the Feb. 7 discussion will be “Plenty: Eating Locally on the 100-Mile Diet” by Alisa Smith.
Held in partnership with the Inland Northwest Food Network, discussions are open to anyone interested in the science, cultivation, and preparation of food.
For more information visit www.inwfoodnetwork.org.

Christmas, New Year's Holidays Impact Library Schedule

Christmas and New Year’s will result in closures for the Coeur d’Alene Public and Lake City Public libraries during December and will also impact meetings for the Friends of the Library and the Library Board of Trustees.
The main library will be closed Sunday and Monday, Dec. 24 and 25, for Christmas. The Lake City library in the high school on Ramsey Road will be closed Monday, Dec. 25. Both libraries will be closed on New Year’s Day.
During the school’s winter break, the Lake City branch will be open 1-5 p.m., Dec. 18-21 and Dec. 26-28.
The Friends of the Library will conduct a combined November-December meeting on Dec. 12 at 10:30 a.m. The Library Board will also meet Wednesday, Dec. 13, at 4 p.m. Both meetings are open to the public.
When the library is closed many services are available through  www.cdalibrary.org. Patrons can access their library records and place holds; download e-books through the OverDrive system and free music from Freegal; and utilize numerous online resources.
Most online resources do require a user name and password. Obtain these before you need them by calling or visiting the library during open hours.

Friday, October 27, 2017

November Calendar - Click for Full Size

Click here for the library's online calendar.

Ruskovich to Share Her Novel, ‘Idaho’

Emily Ruskovich
‘Reading for the Library’ Benefit Nov. 19
“Reading for The Library,” a benefit for the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, will feature regional author Emily Ruskovich, discussing her novel, “Idaho,” Sunday, Nov. 19. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $20 per person, and include a soup dinner – provided by Soul Soup – bread, desserts, and beverages. Tickets are available online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3100699.
The evening is being underwritten by the Columbia Bank, Pita Pit, and the Coeur d’Alene Dental Center.
“Idaho” is the first novel for Ruskovich, who grew up in North Idaho on Hoodoo Mountain. Her fiction has appeared in Zoetrope, One Story, and The Virginia Quarterly Review.
Ruskovich was the winner of a 2015 O. Henry Award and a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She currently teaches creative writing at Boise State University and lives in Idaho City.
In the novel, Ann and Wade have carved out a life for themselves from a rugged landscape in North Idaho, where they are bound together by more than love. With her husband’s memory fading, Ann attempts to piece together the truth of what happened to Wade's first wife and to their daughters.
In a story told from multiple perspectives—including Ann, Wade, and Wade’s first wife Jenny, now serving a life sentence in prison — we gradually learn of the mysterious and shocking act that fractured Wade and Jenny's lives, of the love and compassion that brought Ann and Wade together, and of the memories that reverberate through the lives of every character in “Idaho.”
Information: Coeur d’Alene Public Library Foundation, 208-769-2315 or cdalibraryfoundation@gmail.com.


New Search Feature Taps Wealth of Library Resources

Library patrons now have a choice when looking for information and
materials through the catalog search tool. When looking for books and other
physical items held by the libraries click on the option on the right.
To search all library resources – including databases – click the option on the left.
Library patrons looking for information now have a new tool when using the computer catalog for the Coeur d’Alene and Lake City public libraries and the Community Library Network (CLN).
While patrons can still find books and other physical items through the catalog as usual, the new feature allows a search to expand beyond titles into the libraries’ tremendous collection of information.
A single search not only taps into the libraries’ catalog, but also includes thousands of magazines, journals, newspapers, and reference materials in the libraries’ databases.
The search tool is available through the libraries’ websites as well as at in-library computer catalogs.
If a user wants to save or print an article from a copyrighted database, the library card number needs to be entered and the user password — the cardholder’s last name in all caps.
The card number and password only need to be entered once during the session.
The CLN and the Coeur d’Alene library share catalog services as part of the 28-member Cooperative Information Network (CIN) library consortium in North Idaho and eastern Washington. During this “soft roll-out” of the system not all libraries have opted to begin using it.  
For more information, contact your local library.

2017 Library Holiday Craft Fair Nov. 17-18

Make-It Lab Features Paper Blooms
The Library Holiday Craft Fair will be Friday and Saturday, Nov. 17 and 18, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day in the Community Room.
On Saturday, Nov. 18, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., you can try your hand at a craft yourself by making paper flowers in the library’s Make-It Lab.
Some vendor spaces are still available for the craft fair. Registration forms can be picked up at the library at the Research and Information Desk or requested by e-mail from dtownsend@cdalibrary.org. Registrations will not be accepted over the phone.
This event features regionally produced handmade products.
Vendor space is free, but vendors agree to give 15 percent of sales to the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
Vendors must have a permit to sell in Idaho and will be provided forms to report sales tax information. The library provides one table per vendor and as many chairs as needed.
“Make-It Lab Makes Paper Blooms” was rescheduled from an earlier date. Come and learn to make paper flowers, a simple, quick, and inexpensive way to decorate your home, party, or event. Refreshments will be provided. The activity is free and all materials are provided.
The Make-It Lab opened in August and is a place for people with similar interests, including computing and technology, to gather to work on projects while sharing ideas, equipment, and knowledge.

Kid’s Programs Include Family Reading Evening

Saturday With the Symphony Nov. 4
Children’s Fall Reading Programs continue through Nov. 17 and will feature a special Family reading Evening, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 6-7:30 p.m.
“Tell Me a Tale,” in the Seagraves Children’s Library will celebrate Idaho Family Reading Week with a puppet show, free books, and other fun activities.
On Saturday, Nov. 4, beginning at 12 p.m., Saturday With the Symphony will feature musicians from the Coeur d’Alene Symphony performing in the Community Room.
Following a break during Thanksgiving week, the library’s Holiday Programs will begin Nov. 27 and continue through Dec. 22.
The regular library Fall Reading Programs include:
► Spanish Bilingual Storytime: Mondays, 11 a.m. Learn some Spanish through stories, activities, and crafts for ages 3-5.
► Book Babies Lapsit: Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m., and Fridays, 10:30 a.m., for children ages newborn to 2 accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver.
► Toddler Time Music & Motion: Tuesdays, 11 a.m., fun, songs, movement, and a story for 2-3 year olds.
► Lake City LEGO Club: Tuesdays, 4 p.m., at the Lake City Public Library in the high school on
Ramsey Road. (Will continue during Thanksgiving week.)
► Preschool Storytime: Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., stories and a craft geared to ages 3-5.
► Code Club: Wednesday, 4 p.m., learn coding basics with robots and video games. For ages 7-11.
► LEGO Club: Thursdays, 4 p.m., free play with the library’s huge collection of LEGOs.  Generally for ages 5 -10.
► Stay & Play: Fridays, 11 a.m., after Book Babies families can stay for fun and socializing.
Children under 6 visiting the libraries need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.
For more information call 208-769-2315 Ext. 438 or e-mail Susan Thorpe, Youth Services Supervisor, at sthorpe@cdalibrary.org.

3D Maker Club for Young Patrons

The library will introduce its new 3D printer with a Maker Club for young patrons which will begin meeting Tuesdays on Nov. 14, 4-5:30 p.m.
The library received a grant through the Idaho STEM Action Center funded by the Digital Harbor Foundation in Baltimore, Md., which provided for 3D printer and staff training. Local funding for related supplies was provided by a $1,000 grant from the Friends of the Library.
Registration is required for the 3D Maker Club, which is open to youth in grades 5-9, about ages 10-14. The group will meet weekly into 2018 with breaks on Dec. 26 and Jan. 2.

NaNoWriMo A Chance to Draft Your First Book

November is National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) and once again the library will provide teens space to work on their novels.
NaNoWriMo Participants attempt to write a 50,000 word manuscript between Nov. 1 and Nov. 30. The project focuses on the length of a work rather than the quality, encouraging writers to finish their first draft so that it can later be edited at the author's discretion.
The project started in July 1999 with 21 participants, but by the 2010 event, over 200,000 people took part and wrote a total of over 2.8 billion words.
The library will provide teens scheduled writing hours beginning on Thursday, Nov. 2, at 4 p.m. and continuing each Monday at 4 p.m. through Nov. 27.
Writing prompts, writing materials, and snacks will be provided.
The will be no other teen programs during Thanksgiving week, Nov. 19-25.
Other teen activities in November include:
► Library Dungeons and Dragons: Tuesday, 4-6 p.m. in the Gozzer Room.
► Teen Anime Club: Wednesdays, 4-5:30 p.m. locations to be determined.
► Library League of Legends: Fridays 4-5:30 in the Shirley Parker Storyroom.
► Breakfast Book Club: Saturday, Nov. 18, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Enjoy a book discussion and a late breakfast.
For more information contact Young Adult Coordinator Talley Gaskins, tgaskins@cdalibrary.org or call 208-769-2315 Ext. 469.Teen activities are also highlighted at www.facebook.com/4Teens-at-CdA-Library.

‘Being Mortal’ Looks at End-of-Life Issues

Atul Gawande
Hospice of North Idaho introduces critically-acclaimed Frontline documentary “Being Mortal” in a free community screening on Wednesday, Nov. 8, 10:30 a.m. at the library.
Atul Gawande, acclaimed author and surgeon pitches some of life’s biggest questions to his readers; questions about our death and how we deal with it.
In his book, and later-developed documentary, Gawande explains what he learned about tough questions, tough decisions, and the various ways people manage fact, reality and fear in the face of death.
Encountering patients’ fear is not uncommon for clinical staff at our area’s local, community-owned Hospice of North Idaho. For 36-years, Hospice of North Idaho has been the area’s trusted community Hospice. Last year nearly 4,500 people received Hospice care, palliative care, and grief and loss care from this local non-profit. Hospice’s approach is to help their patients realize what they most want in their end-of-life experience and to show them the many choices they have. 
Hospice’s Community Palliative Care Nurse, Peggy Hodge, says, “It is easy for people to feel disempowered after receiving a life-limiting diagnosis, especially if they are not presented with a different perspective. Our philosophy is to provide compassionate care, giving as much information as we have to empower our patients to make decisions they are satisfied with.”
Fear often clouds-over the personal path to self-choice. The book and documentary “Being Mortal” provides examples of how to have the hard conversations as life draws to a close. Kelly Rey, Hospice of North Idaho Director of Social Services helps our community walk through that process. “We, as a society don’t really talk about our wishes for our death. We do have a choice to die with peace and dignity, without pain, regrets, or suffering.”
Explore your goals and empower your voice. Join the discussion with panelists Robert Ancker, MD: Kootenai Health Palliative Care Physician and Hospice of North Idaho Co-Medical Director; Cindy Reed, RN, CHPN Director of Hospice of North Idaho’s Schneidmiller House, and Executive Director Kim Ransier RN.

Final Milestones Looks at Skiing for Nov. 30 Session

The final presentation in the current Inland Northwest Milestones series with Robert Singletary will look at the history of skiing in North Idaho. The program will be Thursday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m., one week later than usual due to the Thanksgiving holiday.
A regional historian, Singletary is program and marketing director for the Museum of North Idaho.
There will be no Milestones program in December, but Singletary will begin a new series of programs in January.

STCU Offering Free Finance Workshop

“Organize Your Finances” is the next free STCU workshop at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library on Wednesday, Nov. 1, beginning at noon.
The workshop includes a light meal and will feature information on
the benefits of getting organized, how to develop an efficient bill-paying system, what records need to be kept and for how long, and what to have handy in case of a natural disaster.
Registration is requested. Sign up online at stcu.org/workshops or by calling 855-753-0317.

Beyond the Book Club Meets Nov. 7

The Beyond the Book Club is reading “The Glass Castle,” by Jeanette Walls and will discuss the book and create a related watercolor on Tuesday, Nov. 7, at 11:30 a.m. The group will also meet Nov. 21.
The book for the Dec. 5 and 19 discussions will be “The Five People You Meet in Heaven.”

Knitting Club, Coloring Programs Invite Members

The Well-Knit Tale Knitting Club is offered the first and third Tuesday of the month at 2:30 p.m. in the Jameson Room.
All skill levels of knitters and crocheters are welcome. Bring yarn, needles, and patterns. Refreshments provided.
Coffee and Coloring for adults meets the second and fourth Tuesday each month at 10 a.m. Drawing materials and refreshments are provided, or bring your own.

‘Lab Girl’ the Selection for Pageturners Book Club

The Pageturners Library Book Club is “Lab Girl” by Hope Jahren with Joy Fitzpatrick leading the discussion Wednesday, Nov. 29 at 10:15 a.m.
The group will meet one week later than usual due to the Thanksgiving holiday.
The discussion is open to any adult reader and the books can be checked out at the Research and Information Desk.
The book club does not meet in December.

Food For Thought Club Reading ‘My Organic Life’

The Food for Thought Book Club is reading “My Organic Life” by Nora Pouillon. The book will be discussed Wednesday, Dec. 6, at 6 p.m. in the Gozzer Room.
Growing up on a farm in the Austrian Alps and later in Vienna, Pouillon was surrounded by fresh and delicious foods. So when she moved to Washington, D.C., in the 1960s, she was horrified to discover a culinary culture dominated by hormone-bloated meat and unseasonal vegetables.
First as a cooking teacher, then as a restaurateur, and eventually as the founder of America’s first certified organic restaurant, Pouillon redefined what food could be, forging close relationships with local producers and launching initiatives to take the organic movement mainstream.
Held in partnership with the Inland Northwest Food Network, discussions are open to anyone interested in the science, cultivation, and preparation of food.
For more information visit www.inwfoodnetwork.org.

Help Yourself, Library With Up-To-Date Information

If you change your phone number, address, e-mail address or your name, be sure to contact the library to update your library card account.
If you don’t have your e-mail on your account, it’s a good idea to add it. E-mail is often the easiest way for the library to contact you about holds and due dates.
E-mail also helps the library reduce costs by eliminating paper products and postage and keeps waste paper out of the landfills.
Treat your library card as if it was a credit card and do not share your number with others. Cardholders are financially responsible for materials checked out in their name.

Holidays Will Affect Library Hours, Meetings

Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving will result in closures during November and will also impact the meetings for the Friends of the Library and the Library Board of Trustees.
The main library will be closed Friday and Saturday, Nov. 10 and 11, for Veterans Day and Thursday and Friday, Nov. 23 and 24, for Thanksgiving. The Lake City Public Library on Ramsey Road will be closed Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 22 and 23.
Except for the LEGO Club at the Lake City Public Library Tuesday, Nov. 21, at 4 p.m., there will be no children’s programs during the week of Nov. 19-25.
Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, the Friends of the Library will conduct a combined November-December meeting on Dec. 12 at 10:30 a.m. The Library Board will also meet Wednesday, Dec. 13, at 4 p.m. Both meetings are open to the public.
Inland Northwest Milestones with Robert Singletary – normally offered the fourth Thursday of the month – will be presented on Nov. 30 at 7 p.m.
When the library is closed many services are available through the website, www.cdalibrary.org. Patrons can access their library records and place holds; download e-books through the OverDrive system and free music from Freegal; and utilize numerous online resources through the library databases.
Most online resources do require a user name and password. Obtain these before you need them by calling or visiting the library during open hours.

International Games Day Event Planned

The library will join thousands of other libraries around the world celebrating the popularity and educational, recreational, and social value of video and board games for International Games Week 2017.
International Games Day will be hosted by the library on Saturday, Nov. 4, 4-7 p.m. in the Community Room.
Activities will include Super Smash Bros, Mario Kart, League of Legends, board games, and more. Snacks and prizes will be awarded. Suitable for ages 12 and up.

Friday, September 22, 2017

October Calendar - Click for full size

Click here for the library's online calendar.

Ten-Year Honors for Friends

The Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library were recognized for their ongoing support for the library with a plaque from the Library Foundation during a reception on Sept. 9 marking the ten years the library has been on Front Avenue. Pictured, left to right, are Foundation President Ben Drake, current Friends President Peggy Appleman, and past Friends President Judy Edwards. The Friends of the Library formed in the 1970s to raise funds for library programs, books, and equipment along with building a new library. The Friends contributed nearly $250,000 toward the current building where their volunteers operate Second Story Books in the lobby.

A Vietnam Dialogue for Educators

Library, IPTV Partners for Screening, Discussion
Educators and other interested adults are invited are to a special screening of The Ken Burns’ documentary on the Vietnam War at the library on Monday, Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. with staff from Idaho Public Television.
“A Vietnam Dialogue: Ken Burns for Educators” will include the screening followed by a discussion and a review of the free educational resources available for teachers from PBS.
The 63-minute compilation melds pieces of the longer 18-hour documentary into an intense and evocative overview of the entire series, which first began airing Sept. 17. The documentary, by Burns and Lynn Novick, took 10 years to complete and examines the Vietnam War conflict from all sides, including both the North and South Vietnamese viewpoints.
It utilizes graphic footage and photos from the war which may be disturbing to some viewers. In light of this, the free public event is not recommended for children.
Direct U.S. military involvement ended on Aug. 15, 1973. The fall of Saigon in April 1975 marked the end of the war.
The war exacted a huge human cost in terms of fatalities. Estimates of the number of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians killed vary from 966,000 to 3.8 million. Some 240,000–300,000 Cambodians, 20,000–62,000 Laotians, and 58,220 U.S. service members also died in the conflict, and a further 1,626 Americans remain missing in action.

Star Wars Reads Day Oct. 7

Saturday With the Symphony Resumes
Star Wars Reads Day – a program to encourage early reading through the popular sci-fi franchise – will be hosted by the library Saturday, Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m., in the Community Room.
The event will feature Star Wars games, crafts, activities – and a visit from the 501st Legion.
At 3 p.m. a free movie – Rogue One (PG-13) will be screened  in the Community Room. “Star Wars Rebels: Spark of Rebellion” – the two-part pilot for the animated series –will be screened in the Shirley Parker Story Room, also at 3 p.m.
On Saturday, Oct. 21, beginning at 12 p.m. the Saturday With the Symphony concerts resume with musicians from the Coeur d’Alene Symphony. The performers will play on the library’s veranda and the audience is invited to bring lawn chairs, lunches, and blankets to the park to listen.
Another concert is scheduled for Nov. 4 at noon, that will be hosted in the Community Room.
The regular library Fall Reading Programs include:
► Spanish Bilingual Storytime: Mondays, 11 a.m. Learn some Spanish through stories, activities, and crafts for ages 3-5.
► Book Babies Lapsit:  Tuesdays, 10:15 a.m., and Fridays, 10:30 a.m., for children ages newborn to 2 accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver.
► Toddler Time Music & Motion: Tuesdays, 11 a.m., fun, songs, movement, and a story for 2-3 year olds.
► Lake City LEGO Club: Tuesdays, 4 p.m., at the Lake City Public Library in the high school on
Ramsey Road.
► Preschool Storytime: Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., stories and a craft geared to ages 3-5.
► Code Club: Wednesday, 4 p.m., learn coding basics with robots and video games. For ages 7-11.
► LEGO Club: Thursdays, 4 p.m., free play with the library’s huge collection of LEGOs.  Generally for ages 5 -10.
► Stay & Play: Fridays, 11 a.m., after Book Babies families can stay for fun and socializing.
Children under 6 visiting the libraries need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.
For more information call 208-769-2315 Ext. 438 or e-mail Susan Thorpe, Youth Services Supervisor, at sthorpe@cdalibrary.org.

Weekly Sessions of Library Dungeons & Dragons Offered

Teen patrons will be able to enjoy weekly sessions of Library Dungeons and Dragons throughout Oct. The activity is offered each Tuesday, 4-6 p.m. in the Gozzer Room.
Other teen activities will include:
► Teen Anime Club: Wednesdays, 4-5:30 p.m. locations to be determined.
► Library League of Legends: Fridays 4-5:30 in the Shirley Parker Storyroom.
► Teen Read Week Reading Challenge: Oct. 9-14. Read, take selfies, post to social media and be entered in to a drawing to win movie tickets.
► Breakfast Book Club: Saturday, Oct. 21, 11a.m. to 12 p.m. Enjoy a book discussion and a late breakfast.
► Make-It Lab Hour: Thursday, Oct. 26, 4-5 p.m. We will be upcycling items to make creepy Halloween themed crafts.
► Teen Movie and Game Night: Friday, Oct. 27, 5-8 p.m. in the Community Room.
For more information contact Young Adult Coordinator Talley Gaskins, tgaskins@cdalibrary.org or call 208-769-2315 Ext. 469. Teen activities are also highlighted at www.facebook.com/4Teens-at-CdA-Library.

Ten-Year Party

The library marked “Ten Years on Front” Sept. 10 with a community party that began with the ninth annual Birthday Party for Mudgy & Millie and then grew to include activities inside and out including live music—with Coeur Marimba and Deep Roots, jump houses, puppet shows, free books for kids, and other fun.










Peter Fromm To Discuss ‘Names of the Stars’

Peter Fromm
Missoula author Peter Fromm will discuss his latest book, “The Names of the Stars,” during an author talk Friday, Oct. 20, at 7 p.m. at the library presented in partnership with The Well-Read Moose. The event is also sponsored by the Friends of the Library.
At 20 years old, Fromm heard of a job babysitting salmon eggs, seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. Leaping at this chance to be a mountain man, with no experience in the wilds, he left his normal world. Thirteen years later, he published his beloved memoir of that winter, “Indian Creek Chronicles ― Into the Wild with a Twist.”
Twenty five years later, he was asked to return to the wilderness to babysit more fish eggs. But no longer a footloose 20-year-old, at 45, he was the father of two young sons. He left again, alone, straight into the heart of Montana’s Bob Marshall wilderness, walking a daily ten mile loop to his fish eggs through deer and elk and the highest density of grizzly bears in the lower 48 states.
“The Names of the Stars” (St. Martins, 2016) is not only a story of wilderness and bears but also a trek through a life lived at its edges, showing how an impulsive kid transformed into a father without losing his love for the wilds.
Fromm is a five-time winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award for his novels, “If Not For This,” “As Cool as I Am,” and “How All This Started,” his story collection “Dry Rain,” and “Indian Creek Chronicles.” The film of “As Cool as I Am” was released in 2013.
He is also the author of four other story collections and has published more than 200 stories in magazines. He is on the faculty of Oregon’s Pacific University’s Low-Residency Master of
Fine Arts Program and lives in Montana.